Coffee and Music | The Lunchtime Portraits

Coffee and Music | The Lunchtime Portraits

*  Rolleiflex 2,8F Planar  *
*  Ilford FP4 Plus  *
*  Developed in Kodak TMax  *
*  Epson V500 scanner  *
*  Photoshop CS6  *

www.DavidStumpp.com

The Lunchtime Portraits

The Lunchtime Portraits

Workers for the Bodleian Library renovation team breaking for lunch on the stairs of the Clarendon Building, Broad Street, Oxford.

*  Rolleiflex 2,8F Planar  *
*  Ilford FP4 Plus  *
*  Developed in Kodak TMax  *
*  Epson V500 scanner  *
*  Photoshop CS6  *

www.DavidStumpp.com

Smoking Section | The Lunchtime Portraits

Smoking Section | The Lunchtime Portraits

* Rolleiflex 2,8F Planar *
* Ilford FP4 Plus *
* Developed in Kodak TMax *
* Epson V500 scanner *
* Photoshop CS6 *

www.DavidStumpp.com

Test Subjects | The Lunchtime Portraits

Test Subjects | The Lunchtime Portraits

I have a friend who swears by the Rolleiflex 6000 series cameras, so when I found myself with an opportunity to try one, I did. It was, indeed, an impressive camera; solidly built, with great features. Like slipping into the driver’s seat of a Cadillac. A big draw to the camera was the built in metering system, so I put away the spot meter for my test rolls and used the camera’s readings. They were right on. The optics are Zeiss, my favorite, and the camera’s size didn’t differ dramatically from my twin lens cameras.

I am a lover of mechanical film cameras, though, and this camera was too electronic for me. In particular, the film advance is motorized and quite noisy. As much as I appreciate the 6003 as a professional’s camera, a tool engineered for spectacular results, I do wish it had been designed with a hand crank. In the end, my quiet, simple, non-electric cameras remain a better fit for me.

* Rolleiflex 6003 Professional *
* Rollei Planar PQS 2.8/80mm *
* Ilford FP4 Plus *
* Developed in Kodak TMax *
* Epson V500 scanner *
* Photoshop CS6 *

www.DavidStumpp.com

The Sit | The Lunchtime Portraits

The Lunchtime Portraits

So, I was out on one of my usual lunchtime beats which included Cornmarket, a place lively at mid-day with street performers. I could see that Max Moonlight was drawing a crowd, and then I happened to notice these two women sitting in the doorway of the recently-closed The Works storefront, just opposite the performance. In camp chairs. With thermoses. And by their expressions, it was clear that they weren’t sitting there for the solo-guitar show.

This is Ching Yu and her sister. I approached them and asked about a possible photograph. “Why, do we look interesting to you?” she asked. I observe life on Cornmarket frequently, and I assured her their presence in a locked doorway, seated in camp chairs, was not a usual sight. She smiled and agreed to the photograph, and explained that they were watching their vending booth. It was closed, now, but had been set up in front of St Michael at the Northgate, across the street, and they were awaiting pending word from the city council. Even though licensed, they were somehow shut down on a complaint issued by the gift shop within St Michael. I am happy to report that Ching and family had their business back up and running within a few weeks.

*  Rolleiflex 3,5F Planar  *
*  Kodak Ilford FP4 Plus  *
*  Developed in Kodak Tmax  *
*  Epson V500 scanner  *
*  Photoshop CS6  *

www.DavidStumpp.com